Surge of Migrants Heading North Has Chicago, New York at a ‘Breaking Point’

  • Muscle4Muscle2009

    Member
    December 31, 2023 at 3:11 am

    <yawn>. Get rid of the republicans and this gets fixed. VOTE!!

  • ObscureandFuzzy

    Organizer
    December 31, 2023 at 11:27 am

    Muscle4Muscle2009

    Member December 31, 2023 at 3:11 am

    <yawn>. Get rid of the republicans and this gets fixed. VOTE!!

    How would that fix this particular problem?

  • Muscle4Muscle2009

    Member
    January 1, 2024 at 3:31 am

    Reply to ObscureandFuzzy to my reply to this thread: This is a no-brainer dude. The republicans only USE immigration as a talking point and fundraising strategy to continue the lies, mis/dis-information and conspiracy BS and fear mongering to fill their pockets with money to save their asses during election cycles. Republicans don’t want to find solutions to immigration and other issues, because it’s a cash cow and a weapon to use against Democrats. Go look at see how many bills they have passed and Biden signed in 2023. ZERO…I wonder why…If you don’t see that obvious and clear-as-day truth, I really can’t help you. At the very least, if we give the Democrats the super majority they need, they will be loyal to their responsibilities and address the issue(s). They take their oath and service to the Republic with more seriousness and commitment to serve then the white-supremist, hillbilly, redneck, white trailer park trash and religious hypocrites that make up the ‘republican party’.

  • outdoorsguy

    Member
    January 1, 2024 at 11:40 am

    Republicans especially the Trump Scum Supporters have no interest in changing the immigration system in the United States.

    The system suits them fine … The Trump Scum Supporting building contractors prefer to hire undocumented workers since they can control, exploit and demonize them .

    The immigrant share of the construction workforce has been consistent—and consistently high—over the past decade despite the Great Recession and the global construction downturn. In some areas of the country, such as the Southwest, all work crews are immigrants.

    This trend is even more pronounced in some hazardous occupations, like construction laborers, roofers, and drywallers. By some counts, nearly one in four fatally injured immigrant workers in the United States is employed in the construction industry.

    https://documentedny.com/2021/11/22/new-york-labor-law/

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  outdoorsguy.
  • ObscureandFuzzy

    Organizer
    January 1, 2024 at 6:15 pm

    Muscle4Muscle2009

    Member January 1, 2024 at 3:31 am

    Reply to ObscureandFuzzy to my reply to this thread: This is a no-brainer dude. The republicans only USE immigration as a talking point and fundraising strategy to continue the lies, mis/dis-information and conspiracy BS and fear mongering to fill their pockets with money to save their asses during election cycles. Republicans don’t want to find solutions to immigration and other issues, because it’s a cash cow and a weapon to use against Democrats. Go look at see how many bills they have passed and Biden signed in 2023. ZERO…I wonder why…If you don’t see that obvious and clear-as-day truth, I really can’t help you. At the very least, if we give the Democrats the super majority they need, they will be loyal to their responsibilities and address the issue(s). They take their oath and service to the Republic with more seriousness and commitment to serve then the white-supremist, hillbilly, redneck, white trailer park trash and religious hypocrites that make up the ‘republican party’.

    I understand your point (denigrating Republicans notwithstanding).

    The problem is that there are 12,000 to 14,000 known “migrants” entering the country every day. Most of them are being allowed to stay in the country and given “court appearance dates” (currently in the year 2031) for their asylum claim to be heard.

    I think we can both agree that the asylum rules are being taken advantage of by these “new arrivals.”

    The New York City Mayor has said the solution is to give these people work permits. Fine. But with unemployment rates so low (according to the Biden admin), where are these jobs going to come from? Do these “new arrivals” have the skills that these jobs require?

    There’s currently a shortage of skilled nurses and other medical professionals. Same goes with pilots. My guess is that few if any of these “new arrivals” possess these skills.

    So, for now, do we keep the “amnesty gates” wide open?

    Or do we turn them back and refer them to the U.S. embassy in their home countries where they are welcome to apply as specified in current U.S. Immigration law?

  • outdoorsguy

    Member
    January 1, 2024 at 8:26 pm

    Yes work permits would be a start. I know many undocumented workers mostly in the Construction industry. They often work for a Trump loving piece of shit contractor . … would rarely hire a documented worker … since then he would have to pay workmens comp and taxes to the gov’t…… even though he takes it out of the undocumented workers pay…. Knowing that they would unlikely put in a claim if injured .

    The system works fine for them ….even though they preach the opposite.

    https://documentedny.com/2021/11/22/new-york-labor-law/

  • ObscureandFuzzy

    Organizer
    January 1, 2024 at 11:03 pm

    @outdoorsguy

    Member January 1, 2024 at 8:26 pm

    Yes work permits would be a start. I know many undocumented workers mostly in the Construction industry. They often work for a Trump loving piece of shit contractor . … would rarely hire a documented worker … since then he would have to pay workmens comp and taxes to the gov’t…… even though he takes it out of the undocumented workers pay…. Knowing that they would unlikely put in a claim if injured .

    The system works fine for them ….even though they preach the opposite.

    Over 2 million have come in over the past 2 years. Do we have 2 million unfilled jobs AND do these 2 million “new arrivals” have the skills required to fill them?

  • outdoorsguy

    Member
    January 2, 2024 at 9:41 am

    American workers are snubbing low-wage jobs that can’t be done remotely, new job search data shows.

    In May 2022 the U.S. Chamber surveyed unemployed workers who lost their jobs during the pandemic to gain more insight on what is keeping them from returning to work. Here are a few of the key findings

    Two thirds (66%) of Americans who lost their full-time job during the pandemic say they are only somewhat active or not very active at all in searching for a new job.

    About half (49%) are not willing to take jobs that do not offer the opportunity for remote work.

    These sectors include childcare, food preparation and service, personal care and home health, and loading and stocking

    Younger respondents, aged 25-34, are prioritizing personal growth over searching for a job right now; 36% say they’re more focused on acquiring new skills, education or training before re-entering the job market.

    Net International Migration to the U.S. is at its lowest levels in decades

    U.S. Census Bureau data shows that net international migration to the U.S. only contributed to a 247,000 person increase to the U.S. population between 2020 and 2021. Compared to the prior decade’s high of a 1,049,000 increase in our population between 2015 and 2016 due to immigration, the impact that immigration has had on U.S. population growth dropped by 76%.

    Construction jobs are plentiful, but workers are scarce

    The construction industry faces a dire labor shortage. The number of construction job openings jumped by 129,000 in February 2023.

    That stands in contrast to the overall job market, where total job openings dipped to 9.9 million in February (down 632,000 from January).

    Even with more money to repair rundown roads and build new bridges, worker shortages loom over an industry already strapped for people. And, with fewer workers, projects could take longer to complete, becoming more expensive as they drag on.

    More workers are leaving the construction industry than entering it. The labor shortage doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon and though it’s a significant challenge, hiring a full staff is vital for contractors to protect their firm’s reputation and employees’ health.

    <div>https://www.uschamber.com/workforce/understanding-americas-labor-shortage</div><div&gt;

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/job-openings-hiring-covid-pandemic/

    https://www.nccer.org/newsroom/the-greater-impact-of-the-construction-labor-shortage-examined/

    </div>

  • Strayan

    Member
    January 2, 2024 at 10:33 pm

    Now plane loads of Indians from Southern Asia, are landing in Mexico.

  • Strayan

    Member
    January 2, 2024 at 10:36 pm

    Remember when President Obama changed the law for illegal aliens entering America, calling them “Dreamers.” The numbers have only increased, under a Biden administration.

  • outdoorsguy

    Member
    January 3, 2024 at 9:33 am

    Florida’s labor shortage spans wide range of industries

    Hardest hit are industries such as construction, restaurants, hotels, roofing, landscaping and farming, which have relied on citizens and undocumented migrant workers.

    “We’re hiring” banners hang above grocery stores in nearly every community in Florida. “Help wanted” signs are taped to storefronts and posted on hundreds of online job boards. Florida’s unemployment rate is nearing a record low, even as the state population grows.

    “Get used to it,” said Ron Hetrick, who lives in St. Johns County, south of Jacksonville. He’s a senior labor economist at the labor market analytics firm Lightcast.

    This is Florida’s new normal, and the results will translate into competitive wages, longer waits for professional and domestic services and higher costs of living — for everyone.

    Florida is unlike many other states because of its fast growth, aging population and dependence on migrants for both skilled and unskilled labor, Hetrick said.

    But a beefed-up state law that attempts to crack down on labor from immigrants without permanent legal status is exacerbating the deep hole in the workforce that may take years to close.

    “What makes Florida unique is that people are moving from all over the country, but the unemployment rate is not going up — it’s going down or holding a low level,” Hetrick explained.

    According to the Florida Chamber of Commerce, which is updating its 2021 Workforce Needs Study, 73% of job creators surveyed in Florida reported challenges in recruiting qualified candidates, and more than 58% reported they anticipate a need for training and “up-skilling” current employees.

    Hardest hit are industries such as construction, restaurants, hotels, roofing, landscaping and agriculture, which traditionally have relied on both citizens and migrant workers without permanent legal status. They have hit a new hurdle with Gov. Ron DeSantis’ recent crackdown on immigrant workers in Florida who lack permanent legal status.

    At DeSantis’ urging, legislators passed a package of immigration-related measures this year that attempt to keep immigrants without permanent legal status from coming into the state and make it more difficult for those living here to stay.

    Dependence on migrant labor

    Greg Batista, founder and owner of G. Batista Engineering & Construction, has seen the impact of the new laws firsthand. He specializes in condo development in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and employs about 50 people.

    “The immediate impact is that we’ve got four or five ongoing construction jobs at this moment and fewer people to do the jobs,” he said. “The job that you told the owner was going to take five months is now going to take 10 months.”

    He attributes much of the problem to the exodus of construction workers from Florida.

    “They’re just picking up and leaving to a state where they’re more friendly towards migrants, where they don’t have to be looking over their shoulder every 10 seconds and saying, ‘Look, I’m going … to be deported, going to go to jail, or I’m going to be fined,’” he said.

    According to a 2021 analysis of U.S. Census data by the policy research and polling firm KFF, immigrant workers lacking permanent legal status in Florida made up 11% of the state’s workforce, including 37% of all agriculture workers, 23% of construction workers, 14% of service workers and 14% of transportation workers.

    In Miami-Dade County, the numbers are even higher: 65% of the county’s employed labor force are immigrants, according to the county’s Office of New Americans.

    https://www.tampabay.com/news/florida-politics/2023/10/08/labor-shortage-industries-unemployment-rate-growth-aging-migrant/

  • ObscureandFuzzy

    Organizer
    January 3, 2024 at 7:56 pm

    @Strayan

    Member

    January 2, 2024 at 10:33 pm

    Now plane loads of Indians from Southern Asia, are landing in Mexico.

    Yep. Now ANYBODY can come to live in America simply by walking across America’s southern border. How many more millions should be accepted, Democrats?

    • Strayan

      Member
      January 4, 2024 at 2:32 pm

      After all the rebellion from Democrats over Trump building the Southern Border wall, that stoped the moment Biden became POTUS, and Democrats want to blame Republicans for this debacle; fingers.

  • outdoorsguy

    Member
    January 4, 2024 at 2:48 pm

    Border walls are a farce … just construct a taller ladder….the walls are just to appease the ignorant Trump base who have no interest in doing any labor work that the undocumented do.

    America’s Dairyland: Risking Workers’ Lives for the Milk We Drink

    Dairy farms are some of the most dangerous job sites in America. Much of the labor is done by immigrants working on small farms that operate with little safety oversight.

    Central Wisconsin’s Clark County is home to more dairy farms than any other county in the state, which bills itself as America’s Dairyland.

    Its identity is so tied to the dairy industry that a 16-foot-tall, black-and-white talking Holstein stands outside downtown Neillsville, the county seat.

    To corral the cows, milk them and clear their manure at these dairy farms — the dirty, dangerous work that makes this multibillion-dollar industry go — farm owners here and across Wisconsin rely on a labor force that they know is largely undocumented.




    https://investigatemidwest.org/2023/08/08/wisconsins-dairy-industry-relies-on-undocumented-immigrants-but-the-state-wont-let-them-legally-drive/

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  outdoorsguy.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  outdoorsguy.
    • Strayan

      Member
      January 5, 2024 at 3:59 am

      Border walls have worked in Northern Ireland, and Israel.

    • Strayan

      Member
      January 5, 2024 at 4:03 am

      I support the Dairy Farmers, and the Cheese makers too. Since I have family in Wisconsin, who are famous for their quality of Cheese, and they’ve been making cheese, for five generations now too.

    • Strayan

      Member
      January 5, 2024 at 4:10 am

      But illegal aliens, are already breaking the law by being in America undocumented. Thus shouldn’t qualify for work insurance, or compensation. It’s a consequence, that should come with being an illegal alien breaking the law.

  • outdoorsguy

    Member
    January 5, 2024 at 3:40 pm

    Yeah border walls worked out well for the Criminal Apartheid state…. Northern Ireland has not a border wall since the 1990’s and does not want one

    https://youtu.be/hgqAvFGML7c

  • ObscureandFuzzy

    Organizer
    January 7, 2024 at 12:39 pm

    @Strayan

    Member January 5, 2024 at 3:59 am

    Border walls have worked in Northern Ireland, and Israel.

    Strayan

    Member January 5, 2024 at 4:03 am

    I support the Dairy Farmers, and the Cheese makers too. Since I have family in Wisconsin, who are famous for their quality of Cheese, and they’ve been making cheese, for five generations now too.

    Strayan

    Member January 5, 2024 at 4:10 am

    But illegal aliens, are already breaking the law by being in America undocumented. Thus shouldn’t qualify for work insurance, or compensation. It’s a consequence, that should come with being an illegal alien breaking the law.

    I agree on all points.

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